Main Article Content

Abstract

Self-estimated intelligence is an underresearched topic in Indonesia. In fact, self-estimated intelligence is an important thing as it describes an individual's metacognitive processes and it has a crucial role in academic and workplace. The purpose of this study was to determine the self-estimated intelligence in terms of gender and big five personality traits. The study was conducted through a quantitative survey to 265 college students (Mage = 19.40; SD = .98). The instrument used was the Self-Estimated Intelligence Scale and the IPIP-BFM-25 to measure the big five personality. The results showed that men had higher self-estimated intelligence than women. Multiple regression analysis showed that the three predictors of personality facets (agreeableness, conscientiousness, and intellect) positively predict self-estimated intelligence. Conscientiousness is the strongest predictor of self-estimated intelligence, followed by agreeableness and intellect.

Keywords

big five personality gender self-estimated intelligence estimasi diri mengenai inteligensi kepribadian big five

Article Details

How to Cite
Akhtar, H., & Silfiasari, S. (2022). Gender and personality differences in self-estimated intelligence. Jurnal Psikologi Ulayat: Indonesian Journal of Indigenous Psychology. https://doi.org/10.24854/jpu423

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